Greater Manchester schools: in an education crisis?

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THE debate over more investment in Greater Manchester schools has rose again after thousands were denied places to their preferred schools.

Across Greater Manchester, 1,590 children missed out on their school of choice – whilst 508 kids didn’t get into any of their preferred schools.

Greater Manchester

Greater Manchester schools

With a rising population across Greater Manchester and increasing demand for more school places – it raises the question as to whether there is enough being done to combat students suffering a poor education.

With the Greater Manchester Mayoral Election taking place in May – various candidates have already stated their intention to use a portion of their £300m regional budget on fixing the regions education crisis.

Sean Anstee, the Conservative Party candidate has already pledged to introduce ‘gap year’ project for youngsters during education to get them ready for industry – roles which would include helping the homeless, working in care homes supporting the elderly and helping younger children in schools – but the issue is also fixated around the teaching being given in schools.

It was revealed last month that Cedar Mount, an East Manchester school based in Gorton had seen its GCSE results slide since they had been taken over by educational trust Bright Futures amid concerns of ‘declining standards’ which has brought light to the issues facing deteriorating grades in the Greater Manchester area.

Whilst schools such as St David High School in Crumpsall, Manchester Enterprise Academy and Parrs Wood High School were found to be scoring high, schools such as Droylsden Academy, Cedar Mount and Audenshaw High School have all seen their grades plummet in recent years, with Audenshaw regularly threatened with the prospect of them becoming an academy.

This has produced greater inequality and division between areas of Greater Manchester, with Trafford and Tameside sitting on dividing ends of the spectrum.

As previously touched on, the creation of a Directly Elected Mayor will enable the candidate elected to create better standards for schools, through opening new schools to funding new free schools to lift children out of poverty, offering them a better a life with a better education.

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