2017 word of the year announced

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’YOUTHQUAKE’ has been named word of the year by Oxford Dictionary.

The definition of Youthquake is ‘a significant cultural, political or social change arising from the actions or influence of young people’

Each year, Oxford Dictionary choose a word of the year which has attracted a lot of interest in the last year.

Word of the year was first coined in the 1960s. Vogue editor Diana Vreeland used it to describe sudden fashion and music changes led by the youth.

‘Youthquake’ was chosen for 2017 word of the year because of the political interest from young people this year. The unexpected surge of young voters on 8 June caused headlines.

Oxford Dictionary say that ‘youthquake’ was chosen because ‘The data collated by our editors shows a fivefold increase in usage of youthquake in 2017 compared to 2016, the word having first struck in a big way in June with the UK’s general election at its epicentre.’

Other words that made the shortlist for word of the year are:

Antifa: a short word for “anti-fascist”

Broflake: a man who is readily upset by progressive attitudes, from the derogatory use of “snowflake”

Kompromat: the Russian term for material used in blackmail

Unicorn: adding rainbow colours to things – especially food

Milkshake duck: a person or character on social media that appears to be endearing at first, but is found to have an unappealing back story

This may be the work of the year but do people actually know what it is and do they care?

The people of Salford seemed pretty indifferent about the word:

“‘I did not know what the word of the year was. I do care a bit because it’s the word of the year it’s pretty big.”

Another said: “I’m not particularly bothered but I guess it’s good about youth getting more into politics.”

However some felt differently, one person said:

“There’s a strong engagement more recently with youth and how they choose to put their voice across compared to previous years and its really positive.”

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  1. Pingback: Word of the year | Hope pickup

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